Financial PlanningTax AdviceShort & Long-Term Capital Gains Tax Rates: Understanding the Benefits 2023

Short & Long-Term Capital Gains Tax Rates: Understanding the Benefits 2023

How Capital Gains Taxes Work & How To Avoid Them

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Are you ready to take charge of your investment strategy and make the most out of your financial opportunities? Understanding the nuances of short and long term capital gains tax rates is a crucial step towards taking control of your investment strategy.

Did you know that long-term capital gains are often taxed at a lower rate compared to short-term gains? we’ll explore how leveraging the tax advantage of long-term capital gains can maximize your returns, specifically with stocks and real estate. Whether you’re an experienced investor or just starting out, this guide will provide valuable insights and strategies to navigate the complex world of capital gains taxation.

See my recent articles on Capital Gains Tax on a Home Sale and 15 Ways To Avoid Paying Capital Gains Tax On Stocks.

Let’s dive in together and unlock the hidden benefits of short and long-term capital gains tax rates to pave the way for your financial success.

Capital Gain Key Points

> Long-term investments: Holding investments for more than one year can qualify you for the lower long-term capital gains tax rate. This can help reduce the amount of tax you owe on your investment profits.
> Tax-loss harvesting: One way to offset capital gains tax is through tax-loss harvesting. This involves selling investments at a loss and using the losses to offset the gains from the sale of high-performing stocks.
> Tax-friendly states: Moving to a state that doesn’t have a capital gains tax can be a strategy to avoid paying taxes on your investment profits. It’s worth considering if you’re looking to minimize your tax liability.
> Utilizing tax-advantaged accounts: Contributing to tax-advantaged accounts such as 401(k)s and IRAs can help lower your taxable income and potentially reduce your capital gains tax rate. This strategy can provide both short-term and long-term tax benefits.
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What is a Capital Gain and Capital Gains Tax Rate?

Capital gains tax is a tax levied on the profits made from the sale of a capital asset, such as a property or investment, at a lower rate than the ordinary income tax rate. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at both short-term and long-term capital gains tax rates and what you need to know to best manage your finances.

Now meet Donna, an aspiring investor who decided to dive into the world of stocks. She diligently researched companies, analyzed market trends, and made strategic investment choices. As her investments grew, Sarah realized the importance of capital gains tax rates. By holding onto her stocks for the long term, she qualified for the lower tax rate on her capital gains.

The results were astounding. Not only did Sarah see her investments flourish, but she also enjoyed significant tax savings. This allowed her to reinvest her earnings, accelerating her financial progress even further. Sarah’s success story serves as a testament to the hidden benefits of long-term capital gains tax rates.

Now, it’s your turn to seize this opportunity. In this article, we’ll delve into the world of capital gains and explore how you can leverage this tax advantage to maximize your returns. Whether you’re an experienced investor or just starting out, this guide will provide valuable insights and strategies to navigate the complex landscape of capital gains taxation.

Are you ready to unlock the hidden benefits of short and long-term capital gains tax rates? Let’s embark on this journey together and pave the way for your financial success.

Definition of Capital Gain and Capital Gains Tax

Capital gain is the profit realized from the sale of a capital asset. Capital gains tax, on the other hand, is the tax charged on the profit made from that sale.

TermDefinition
Capital gainCapital gain refers to the profit you earn when you sell a capital asset, such as stocks, real estate, or artwork.
It is the difference between the purchase price (or cost basis) of the asset and the price at which you sell it.
For example, if you bought a stock for $1,000 and sold it later for $1,500, your capital gain would be $500.
Capital gains taxCapital gains tax is the tax imposed on the profit (capital gain) you make from selling a capital asset.
The tax rate applied to capital gains can vary based on factors such as your income level and the duration of holding the asset.
Typically, long-term capital gains (assets held for more than one year) are taxed at a lower rate compared to short-term gains (assets held for one year or less).
The purpose of capital gains tax is to generate revenue for the government and ensure that individuals contribute a portion of their investment profits.

Understanding these terms is essential for navigating the world of investments and taxation. By grasping the concept of capital gain and capital gains tax, you can make informed decisions about your assets and optimize your tax liabilities.

Remember, consulting with a tax professional or financial advisor is always recommended to fully understand the specific regulations and implications related to capital gains tax in your jurisdiction.

How Capital Gains Tax Work?

Capital gains tax is determined by subtracting the purchase price of the asset and any associated costs from the sale price of an asset. You will have to pay tax on the gains if your profits exceed the allowable exclusion amount for a specific tax year.

Did you know that investors who take advantage of long-term capital gains tax rates can potentially save a significant amount of money? 

Imagine the impact this can have on your investment returns over time. By strategically planning your investments and qualifying for the lower tax rate on long-term capital gains, you can keep more of your hard-earned money in your pocket. It’s a powerful advantage that can accelerate your wealth accumulation and provide you with greater financial freedom.

A SIMPLIFIED EXPLANATION

Imagine you bought a stock for $1,000, and after some time, you sold it for $1,500. The $500 difference between the purchase price and the sale price is your capital gain. Now, the capital gains tax comes into play.

  • Capital gains tax is calculated by subtracting the purchase price of the asset ($1,000), including any associated costs like brokerage fees,
  • From the sale price ($1,500).
  • The resulting profit ($500) is what you’ll be taxed on.

However, not all gains are subject to tax.

The tax rules vary depending on the state you live in and the duration of time you held the asset.

  • Generally, if you held the asset for more than one year, it’s considered a long-term capital gain. 
  • To further encourage long-term investments, governments often provide tax incentives by imposing lower tax rates on long-term capital gains.
  • Long-term capital gains are often taxed at a lower rate compared to short-term gains, which are gains from assets held for one year or less. 
  • This means that if you plan your investments strategically and qualify for the lower tax rate, you can potentially save a significant amount of money.

It’s interesting to note that the wealthiest individuals tend to benefit the most from capital gains. In fact, according to the NBER, the richest 2 percent of Americans receive more than 50 percent of all capital gains. But by understanding how capital gains tax works, you can follow their lead and make informed decisions to maximize your investment returns.

What is the current capital gains tax rate?

The current capital gains tax rate in the United States for 2023 can range from 0% to 20% based on the taxpayer’s income and the length of time they owned the asset. More on that later.

So, if you’re ready to unlock the hidden benefits of short and long-term capital gains tax rates, I invite you to continue reading. Gain the knowledge and tools to make informed decisions that can transform your financial future.

Discover how you can secure your wealth and create a path to financial success.

What is The Difference Between Short-Term Capital Gain & Long-Term Capital Gains Tax?

A capital gain is considered short-term if you held the asset for a year or less. It is classified as long-term if you held it for more than a year. The definition varies from country to country. For example, in India, assets sold within two years are considered short-term capital gains. but let’s stick to the United States…

Definition of short-term capital gain tax and long-term taxes on capital gains

Short-Term Capital Gains Tax RatesLong-Term Capital Gains Tax Rates
Short-term gains from assets held for a year or less are taxed at the same rate as ordinary income tax brackets. These rates can range from 10% to 37% depending on your income and filing status.Long-term gains from assets held for longer than a year are taxed at a lower rate. The rates for long-term capital gains are generally 0%, 15%, or 20%, based on your income.

What is the short-term capital gains tax rate?

The short-term capital gains tax rate applies to assets held for a year or less. Short-term gains are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate, which can range from 10% to 37% depending on your tax bracket.

Short Term Capital Gains Key Points

> Short-term capital gains are taxed at the taxpayer’s top marginal tax rate or regular income tax bracket, which can range from 10% to 37%.
> Short-term capital gains are gains from the sale of assets held for one year or less.
> The actual tax rate for short-term capital gains depends on the investor’s annual income and filing status.
> Short-term capital gains receive less preferential tax treatment compared to assets held for at least one year, which are taxed at lower long-term capital gain rates.
> Therefore, short-term capital gains are taxed at the same rate as ordinary income.

What is the long-term capital gains tax rate?

ltcg long term capital gains
ltcg long term capital gains

The long-term capital gains tax rate applies to assets held for more than a year and is generally lower than short-term rates. The rates can range from 0% to 20% based on your income tax bracket, or 15% if your income bracket is in between.

Long Term Capital Gains Key Points

> Long-term capital gains tax rates are either 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on taxable income and filing status.
> Long-term capital gains are derived from assets that are held for more than one year before they are sold.
> Long-term capital gains tax rates are generally lower than short-term capital gains tax rates.
> The actual tax rate for long-term capital gains depends on the investor’s annual income and filing status.
> Sales of real estate and other types of assets have their own specific form of capital gains and are governed by their own set of rules.

How do capital gains taxes affect stock investments?

Stock gains are taxed as capital gains. You will be taxed on any profits made from the sale of the stock. The amount of tax you pay depends on whether the stock is classified as a short-term or long-term sale.

How are stock gains taxed?

AspectImpact on Stock Gains Taxation
Taxation CategoryStock gains are categorized as capital gains for tax purposes.
Short-Term GainsProfits from stocks held for one year or less (short-term) are subject to taxation at the same rate as federal income taxes.
Tax Rate for Short-Term GainsThe tax rate for short-term capital gains can be as high as 37% depending on your income and federal income tax bracket.
Long-Term GainsGains from stocks held for more than one year (long-term) have a separate tax rate known as the long-term capital gains tax rate.
Tax Rate for Long-Term GainsThe long-term capital gains tax rate can be 0%, 15%, or 20% depending on your income level and filing status.
Additional FactorsOther factors such as specific tax rules, deductions, and exemptions may apply, so it’s advisable to consult a tax professional.

How to calculate capital gains tax on stocks?

You can calculate capital gains tax on stocks by subtracting the purchase price of the stock and any associated costs from the sale price. The result is your profit or capital gains. Capital gains tax is then calculated based on your tax bracket and the length of time you held the asset.

StepDescription
Step 1: Determine Purchase PriceIdentify the price at which you initially purchased the stocks.
Step 2: Account for Associated CostsInclude any costs associated with the purchase, such as broker fees or transaction charges.
Step 3: Determine Sale PriceIdentify the price at which you sold the stocks.
Step 4: Calculate Capital GainsSubtract the purchase price and associated costs from the sale price to determine the capital gains.
Step 5: Determine Holding PeriodDetermine the length of time you held the stocks (short-term or long-term).
Step 6: Identify Tax BracketDetermine your tax bracket based on your income and filing status.
Step 7: Apply Capital Gains Tax RateCalculate the applicable capital gains tax rate based on your tax bracket and holding period.
Step 8: Calculate Capital Gains TaxMultiply the capital gains by the applicable tax rate to determine the capital gains tax.

What are the different stock holding periods for tax purposes?

If you hold the stock for one year or less (short-term), it is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you hold it for more than one year (long-term), it is taxed at a lower, long-term capital gains tax rate.

Holding PeriodTax Treatment
Short-TermTaxed at your ordinary income tax rate (based on federal income tax brackets)
Long-TermTaxed at a lower, long-term capital gains tax rate

How Are Capital Gains Taxed?

Are dividends capital gains?

There is some debate over whether or not dividends are considered capital gains for tax purposes. However, capital gains are typically defined as profits from the sale of capital investments, and dividend income is typically payments made by a corporation to its shareholders. As such, it is generally accepted that dividend income is not capital gains for tax purposes.

The debate: dividends vs capital gains and capital gains vs dividends:

When it comes to taxes, there are two main types of investment income: dividends and capital gains. While both can be significant sources of income, they are taxed differently.
Dividends are payments made by a corporation to its shareholders. They are typically paid out quarterly and are taxed at the shareholder’s marginal tax rate.
Capital gains are profits realized from the sale of an asset, such as a sale of shares in companies or bonds. They are taxed at the rate on capital gains, which is generally lower than the marginal tax rate we pay on our income.
So, which is better from a tax perspective? It depends.
If you are in a high tax bracket, capital gains may be the better choice since they are taxed at a lower rate. On the other hand, if you are in a lower tax bracket, dividends may be the better choice since they are taxed at your marginal rate.

What are the rules for capital gains tax on real estate?

Short term vs long term capital gains

– A capital gain is the increase in the value of an investment. 

– A short term capital gain is a capital gain on an investment that is held for one year or less. 

– A long term capital gain is a capital gain on an investment that is held for more than one year.

Capital Gains Tax on Real Estate

How is capital gains tax on real estate calculated?

Capital gains tax on real estate is calculated the same way as it is for stocks or other types of capital assets. You subtract the sale price from the purchase price and related costs, and then the tax is calculated based on the duration of holding the asset and your tax bracket.

AspectImpact on Stock Investments
Taxation of ProfitsCapital gains taxes are applied to the profits made from selling stocks.
Classification of SalesStock sales are categorized as either short-term or long-term based on the duration of holding.
Short-Term SalesIf you sell stocks held for one year or less (short-term), the profits are taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
Long-Term SalesStocks held for more than one year (long-term) are subject to a lower tax rate known as the long-term capital gains tax rate.
Tax RateThe tax rate for long-term capital gains is typically lower compared to the ordinary income tax rate for short-term gains.

What are the tax rules for home sale?

In the United States, the tax rules for home sales are different from other capital assets. The IRS provides tax exclusions of up to $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for couples who sell their primary residence. If the gains from the sale fall under these exclusions, no capital gains tax is owed.

Sure! Here’s a table summarizing the state taxes on capital gains from real estate in a few popular states in the United States:

StateState Capital Gains Tax RateAdditional Notes
CaliforniaUp to 13.3% (varies based on income level)Capital Gains Tax California has a progressive income tax system.
New YorkUp to 8.82% (varies based on income level)New York also has a progressive income tax structure.
FloridaNo state income tax on capital gainsFlorida does not impose a state income tax.
TexasNo state income tax on capital gainsTexas does not levy a state income tax.
WashingtonNo state income tax on capital gainsWashington does not have a personal income tax.
Massachusetts5.0% flat tax rate on capital gainsMassachusetts has a flat income tax rate.

See my recent article on Which States Have the Highest Taxes

Please note that these tax rates are subject to change, and there may be additional local taxes or exemptions that could affect the final tax liability. It’s always advisable to consult with a tax professional or refer to the specific state’s tax department for the most up-to-date and accurate information.

What are the state taxes on capital gains from real estate?

State capital gains taxes on real estate vary based on the state. Some states do not have any capital gains tax, while others, like California, have a higher rate.

How can I reduce or offset my capital gains tax?

StrategyDescription
Tax-loss harvestingSelling investments at a loss and claiming the loss on your tax return to offset capital gains from the sale of high-performing stocks.
Deducting stock lossesOffsetting taxable capital gains with gross losses. For example, if you have a $20,000 loss and $10,000 in taxable gains, you’ll only pay taxes on $10,000.
Long-term investmentQualifying for the lower long-term capital gains tax rate by holding investments for more than one year.
Move to a tax-friendly stateRelocating to a state that doesn’t have a capital gains tax can help you avoid paying taxes on investment profits.
Use tax-advantaged accountsContributing to tax-advantaged accounts like 401(k)s and IRAs to reduce taxable income and potentially lower the capital gains tax rate.
Donate to charityDonating appreciated assets to charity can help you avoid paying capital gains tax on the appreciation and provide a tax deduction.

It’s important to note that these strategies may have specific requirements or limitations, and their effectiveness can vary based on individual circumstances. Consulting with a tax professional is advisable to ensure proper implementation.

Additionally, individuals with modified adjusted gross income above certain thresholds may be subject to the net investment income tax (NIIT), which is an additional 3.8% tax on certain net investment income, including capital gains. The NIIT can affect your overall tax liability.

Remember to consult a tax professional for personalized advice and to stay updated on any changes to tax laws that may impact your situation.

How to offset capital gains with capital losses?

One way to offset capital gains is with capital losses. If you have a capital loss, you can use it to offset any capital gains you’ve made. Capital losses up to $3,000 can be deducted from your income per year.

How to pay lower capital gains tax rate?

You can pay a lower capital gains tax rate by holding on to your capital asset for more than a year. This will make your asset eligible for a long-term capital gains tax rate, which is lower than the short-term rate.

What is the net investment income tax and how does it affect capital gains tax?

The net investment income tax is an additional 3.8% tax on investment income for high earners. This tax can be applied to both short-term and long-term capital gains, but for most people, it only applies to long-term capital gains.

In conclusion, understanding the details of short-term and long-term capital gains tax rates can help you better manage your finances and make informed investment decisions. Knowing the rules and various methods for offsetting and reducing your tax bill can help you avoid capital gains taxes and make the most of your financial gains.

capital gains tax bracket
Capital gains tax bracket

Tax Bracket Calculator

Which tax bracket am I in?  Use this tax bracket calculator to find out:

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FAQ

How do I Calculate My Cost Basis?

Typically your original cost basis price of an investment is the purchase price of the stock plus costs such as commissions.  Your adjusted basis would be calculated by adding any improvements such as to a personal residence, or additional costs.

Where And How Do I Report Capital Gains?

For section 897 capital gain reporting of a a capital gain or tax losses, you must include the date of the sale or exchange, the selling price, and the cost of the long term capital asset. You also need to know the type of liquid asset you sold. The most common types of assets are stocks, bonds, and mutual funds.
You would typically report sec 897 capital gain sales on Form 8949, Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets, and then a summary of capital gains and capital losses would go on Schedule D (Form 1040), Capital Gains and Losses.

What Happens If I Had a Capital Loss?

If your losses exceed your gains for the year, you can claim up to $3,000 of that loss on line 16 of Schedule D of Form 1040.  You claim the loss on line 7 of Form 1040 or 1040-SR.
If your loss is greater than the $3,000 limit – you then get to carry over the loss to future years.  Publication 550 Capital Loss Carryover Worksheet can help you with this.

Should I Make Estimated Tax Payments For Capital Gains?

To be safe, you probably should make estimated payments to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  Especially if your gains for the year are more substantial.  You can reference  Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax  and Am I Required to Make Estimated Tax Payments?

Where to report section 897 capital gain on 1040?

There are a few different places on your 1040 where you can report your sec 897 capital gain. The first place is on Line 13, which is for “Capital Gains and Losses.” The second place is on Schedule D, which is for “Capital Gains and Losses.” The third place is on Form 8949, which is for “Sales and Other Dispositions of Capital Assets.”

Estimated Tax Payments For Large Capital Gains

Unless you have reasonable to large taxable gains, you may want not have to make estimated tax payments to the IRS to avoid tax penalties.

The only notable exceptions would be if you sold “collectible assets” such as coins, gems, fine art or collectibles. These can be taxed at a maximum of 28% I believe – so you should certainly look at paying estimated taxes on any of these sales.

A second notable exception would be if you are impacted by the net investment income tax NIIT.  This is an additional 3.8% tax for investors with significant investment incomes.

green exit sign for capital gains

How To Calculate Capital Gains and Losses

When it comes time to file your taxes, you’ll need to calculate your gains and losses. This can be a complex process, but it’s important to get it right in order to avoid paying too much or too little in taxes on capital gains.

There are two types of capital gains: short-term and long-term. The tax rate on short-term capital gains is the same as your ordinary income tax rate. The tax rate on long-term capital gains is lower, depending on your tax bracket.

It is important to understand how capital gains tax calculations work, so that you can verify the results.

Calculating Capital Gains and Losses

To calculate your capital gains, you’ll need to know the purchase price of the asset, the sale price, and any associated costs, such as commissions. 

If you’re calculating a loss, you’ll just need the sale price and the associated costs.

Once you have all of the necessary information, you can use a capital gains calculator to determine your tax liability. This can be a helpful tool, but be sure you verify the results.

The most important thing to remember when calculating your capital gains is to be accurate. This is a complex process, and small mistakes can make a big difference in your tax bill. If you’re unsure about anything, it’s best to consult with a tax professional.

H&R Block Capital Gains Tax Calculator

Does Capital Gains Count as Income?

There are a few different types of income, and capital gains is one of them. Capital gains is the profit you make when you sell an investment for more than you paid for it. For example, let’s say you buy a stock for $50 and it goes up to $60. If you sell it, you’ve made a capital gain of $10. 

The way the IRS views income – earned income and unearned income are taxed differently.

What is Earned income?

It is just how it sounds – this is the income you earn, typically as a salary from working a job.  What you earn from working is earned income.

What is Unearned Income?

This is the income that your money earns, not that you earn.  Examples would be when you invest your money and it earns dividends or capital gains.  The difference is that your money earned the income, not you.

What is a Capital Gain Distribution?

This is when unearned income is distributed to you – typically from a mutual fund or ETF investment.

Back to the question – do capital gains count as income?

Capital gains, as you can see from above, are ‘unearned income”.  Capital gains are taxed at a lower rate than other types of income, like wages and salaries. This is because the government wants to encourage people to invest their money. 

The hope is that by taxing capital gains at a lower rate, people will be more likely to invest, and that this will ultimately help the economy grow. 

So, does capital gains count as income? Yes, it does. It counts as unearned income – and long term capital gains are taxed at a lower rate than other types of earned income.

For further information on capital gains taxation and your investment, read the following recent articles:


How to avoid capital gains tax on stocks

How To Minimize and Avoid Capital Gains Taxes

How To Avoid Paying Capital Gains Tax On Stocks – 15 Ways

How To Avoid Paying Capital Gains Tax On Stocks. If you’re like most people, you probably don’t want to pay any more taxes than you have to. That means finding ways to avoid paying capital gains tax. Or at least delaying or minimizing the capital gains tax. Does anyone really enjoy a huge tax bill … Continue reading


Capital Gains Tax on Real Estate

How To Avoid Capital Gains Tax on Home Sale

How To Avoid Capital Gains Tax on Home Sale and more…

You may be aware of the special rules and two-year period benefit for your primary residence. Your principal residence is treated differently than investment properties.

The sale of a home is often the largest financial transaction that most people will ever make. For many, the profit from the sale of their home is a significant source of asset growth, and the tax on that profit can be a significant expense. Want to know how to avoid capital gains tax on … Continue reading


Which States Have the Highest Capital Gains Taxes?

State Capital Gains Tax

State Capital Gains Tax Guide

There are a few ways to tax capital gains, but the most common is through a capital gains tax. This is a tax on the profit from the sale of an asset, such as a stock, bond, or real estate. The capital gains tax rate is typically lower than the income tax rate, and it … 

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Capital Gains Tax on Cryptocurrency

Crypto Tax: What You Need To Know About Crypto Capital Gains Tax

Capital Gains on Cryptocurrency: The IRS first released guidance on the taxation of virtual currency in 2014, and has since updated its guidance as the virtual currency landscape has evolved. The most recent guidance, released in 2019, provides that virtual currency is treated as property for federal level tax purposes. As such, crypto trading on a … Continue reading


Why is Capital Gain Yield Important?

Everything You Need to know About Capital Gain Yield CGY

What is Capital Gains Yield and Why is it Important? Here’s Everything You Need to Know

What is Capital Gain Yield (CGY)? A capital gains yield is a financial modeling formula that measures the increase in the price of an investment – whether it is a stock, bond, etc. It does not include dividends, and the capital gain yield is based only on price increases of the investment. You may have … Continue reading

Next Steps

The article explains what a capital gain is and how you can minimize the capital gains tax. A capital gain is when you sell an asset for more than you paid for it. You can minimize your capital gains tax by holding onto the asset for a long time, selling it when it is worth less than it was when you bought it, or by selling it to a family member.

Key Points:

  1. Tax-loss harvesting allows you to offset capital gains by selling investments at a loss, minimizing your tax liability.
  2. Long-term investments qualify for lower capital gains tax rates, providing potential tax savings for patient investors.
  3. Moving to a tax-friendly state can help you avoid paying capital gains tax altogether, maximizing your investment profits.
  4. Utilizing tax-advantaged accounts like 401(k)s and IRAs can lower your taxable income, reducing your capital gains tax burden.

Why it matters: Reducing capital gains tax is crucial for maximizing investment returns and preserving wealth. By implementing these strategies, you can potentially lower your tax liability, allowing more of your hard-earned money to work for you. Exploring these options can have a significant impact on your financial well-being.

What strategies have you used to reduce capital gains tax? How have they influenced your investment decisions and financial goals? Share your thoughts and experiences with reducing capital gains tax. We’d love to hear your insights and learn from your strategies.

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Speak with your tax advisor, or visit capital gains tax forums such as bogleheads or reddit for more answers.

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Michael Ryan
Michael Ryanhttps://michaelryanmoney.com/
Who Am I? I'm Michael Ryan, a retired financial planner turned personal financial coach. And author and found of blog. My advice is backed by decades of hands-on experience in finance and recognition in esteemed publications like US News & World Report, Business Insider, and Yahoo Finance. 'here'. Find answers to your financial questions, from budgeting to investing and retirement planning, on my blog michaelryanmoney.com. My mission is to democratize financial literacy for all.